Andy Warhol’s Factory was part-studio, part-haunt for amphetamine users, sexual radicals, and superstars. Decked in tin foil, silver paint, metallic balloons, and shattered mirrors to reflect the decadence of the times, the Factory saw its share of “generally large parties” held “after usual office hours.” 



ELK REALTY, INC.
1107 BROADWAY
NEW YORK, N. Y. 10010 
AREA CODE 212 
WATKINS 4-3560 

November 15, 1965 

Mr. Andy Warhol
231 East 47 Street
New York, New York

Dear Mr. Warhol:

We have been advised that you have been giving parties in the fourth floor space occupied by you. We understand that they are generally large parties and are held after usual office hours. We have found that your guests have left debris and litter in the public areas which you have never bothered to clean. Further, we feel that a congregation of the number of people such as you have had may be contrary to various applicable governmental rules and regulations and also might present a serious problem with the Fire Department regulations.

Your lease, of course, does not permit such use and occupancy and you hereby directed not to have any such parties in this building.

Very truly yours,

ELK REALTY, INC., Agents

(Signed)

Alfred R.

Image of letter from Johan Kugelberg’s The Velvet Underground: New York Art (2009). Photographs of the Factory circa 1964–67.